University of San Diego Uses Interactive Art to Promote Peace & Justice

In a world that is constantly moving and chaotic it is hard for one to simply be still and imagine a peaceful, positive world. The University of San Diego recognized that struggle and wanted to find a way for members of the university to engage with peace in a new way. The Joan B. Kroc Institute of Peace and Justice had a desire to “celebrate peace and justice and to invite everyone, students and the community, to jump in and interact with the art.” That led to the Kroc School commissioning interactive mural artist, Kelsey Montague, to create a piece that is able to transport the viewer into a new frame of mind.

Patricia Marquez, the dean of the Kroc School of Peace Studies said that “the current state of the world poses a collective challenge and an obligation to intensify our thinking and inspire action to shape a better world. This piece is part of our vision to prepare students. To transform out societies, learning needs to engage all senses and should happen inside and outside of the classroom. The wall is meant to enhance the learning experience. The hope is that the students will graduate and leave inspired to lead effective change making endeavors across a variety of sectors and organization types.”

You can find more of Montague’s interactive pieces on her Instagram @KelseyMontagueArt or search the hashtag that accompanies all her pieces, #whatliftsyou. The full article can be found here. Photo courtesy of Renata Berto.

Advertisements

Peace and Justice in ACCU’s Summer Newsletter

ACCU recently released the summer edition of Update, our quarterly newsletter. Read Update in full here. Peace and Justice highlights include:

  • ACCU President’s Letter: Celebrating 50 years of Populorum Progressio
  • Rivier Students Participate in Day of Service: In April, Rivier University held its fifth annual First-Year Student Day of Service, contributing hundreds of service hours to Greater Nashua, New Hampshire non-profit organizations.
  • Mount Marty Students Volunteer at Rosebud Indian Reservation: Eighteen students from Mount Marty College recently participated in an annual service opportunity that sends nursing students and non-nursing majors to the Rosebud Indian Reservation to work with Tree of Life Ministry in Mission, South Dakota.
  • Newman Students Focus Art on Syrian Conflict: The atrium in Newman University’s Dugan Library was home to a student-created art exhibit in April, with art designed to depict the conflict in Syria.
  • Emmanuel Students Raise Funds for Children’s Hospital: The sixth annual Emmanuel College Dance Marathon for Boston Children’s Hospital set a new fundraising record this year.
  • Benedictine Holds Social Justice Teach-In: This spring Benedictine University held an all-day “Teach-In on Social Justice and Race” to promote greater understanding of people and issues affecting local communities.
  • Aquinas Awarded Early Childhood Ed. Grant: Aquinas College in Michigan has been awarded a $900,000 grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation to address the shortage of qualified teachers of color available to lead local early childhood education classrooms.

To subscribe to Update, please email Paula Moore.

Loras College to Start Peace Institute for High Schoolers

In response to the growing conflict in our nation and world, Loras College will launch a Peace Institute that will provide emerging area leaders with the opportunity to gain unique skills they can use to promote peace in their personal and professional lives. To respond to the global reality of difference and division, Loras College is establishing the Peace Institute to create a new approach to forming future leaders in the way of peace. For three days, high-school aged youth from a variety of faith backgrounds will participate in an overnight camp and will engage in programming on peace with self, others and the world. They will be taught skills like non-violent communication, inter-religious literacy, and relationship building by professors and area practitioners.

The Loras College Peace Institute will take place August 4-6, 2017.  Applications will be accepted through May 15.  To learn more, visit the Peace Institute’s website.

 

Celebrating the Fiftieth World Day of Peace

On the Fiftieth World Day of Peace, January 1, 2017, Pope Francis’ message to the world promotes nonviolence as a style of politics for peace. In his message, he spoke of nonviolence as being a difficult response, but the only appropriate one to violent conflicts.

He issued a call for nonviolence to all people saying, “It is a challenge to build up society, communities and businesses by acting as peacemakers. It is to show mercy by refusing to discard people, harm the environment, or seek to win at any cost. To do so requires ‘the willingness to face conflict head on, to resolve it and to make it a link in the chain of a new process’. To act in this way means to choose solidarity as a way of making history and building friendship in society. Active nonviolence is a way of showing that unity is truly more powerful and more fruitful than conflict. Everything in the world is inter-connected. Certainly differences can cause frictions. But let us face them constructively and non-violently, so that ‘tensions and oppositions can achieve a diversified and life-giving unity,’ preserving ‘what is valid and useful on both sides’.”

Francis ended with a reminder that “Everyone can be an artisan of peace.” On this World Day of Peace, let us consider how to be creators of peace in our communities.

2016 Global Solidarity Grant Program

Shared Mission

The Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities (ACCU), founded in 1899, is the collective voice of Catholic higher education in the United States. ACCU helps to foster a vibrant Catholic identity at member institutions and supports cooperation among them for the greater good of society and the Church.

Catholic Relief Services (CRS), the international humanitarian relief and development arm of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, has a longstanding and mutually beneficial relationship with Catholic higher education. The relationship was strengthened in 2005 with the creation of the U.S. Operations Division of which Catholic colleges and universities are a central focus. The CRS University website articulates the vision of the CRS Global Campus and its corresponding programs: Student Ambassadors and the Faculty Learning Commons.

As institutions committed to the mission of the Catholic Church, CRS and ACCU share a goal of strengthening Catholic identity on campus and educating students to build a more just and peaceful world. The Global Solidarity Grant Program is one way we live this mission together.

Objective

Catholic Relief Services (CRS) University Engagement and the Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities (ACCU) are jointly offering small grants of up to $3,000 to ACCU member institutions to advance Catholic mission through global solidarity by developing creative projects or enhancing existing structures.

 Two types of grants are being awarded this year –CRS Student Ambassadors grants and CRS Global Campus grants. 

Appropriate projects will draw on the programs and resources of CRS University Engagement. Projects that promote collaboration across campus (i.e., between academic and student life areas), reach a significant portion of the campus population, incorporate advocacy and have a digital and traditional media dimension are highly regarded.  Projects must involve students in a significant way but must have a faculty or staff sponsor.

Student Ambassadors Grant

New this year will be a set of grants awarded to campuses who wish to establish a new CRS Student Ambassador program, or strengthen an existing CRS Student Ambassador program to expand their reach on campus and increase future program sustainability. Campuses are encouraged to consider applying for the grant to train and form student leaders or appropriate faculty and staff to build or strengthen the Student Ambassadors program.  This could include planning an event which launches the group or expands their membership as well as enhancing the leadership structure to engage students for years to come.  Proposals will be accepted that include planning in the 2017 spring semester with implementation in the 2017 spring or fall semesters.

Global Campus Grant

Campuses with an established Student Ambassadors program are encouraged to submit a creative project promoting global solidarity that will help move the campus toward or strengthen an existing CRS Global Campus designation.  Projects are expected to be carried out during the 2017 spring semester.  A key aspect of becoming a CRS Global Campus is to establish an inter-disciplinary stakeholder committee to guide and implement the partnership.  Successful proposals will address how campuses will establish or strengthen these committees through a shared project.  Examples of projects include institutionalizing the CRS Faculty Learning Commons on campus, establishing or enhancing global solidarity events during a campus mission week, or a campus-wide campaign (educational, spiritual, action, fundraising) to promote an aspect of global solidarity.

 Application components

  1. Cover Sheet – List the title of project, primary sponsor(s) and contact information, amount requested, and 100-word description of the project. An administrative contact (grants officer or business office administrator) must be identified. The cover sheet must be signed by the sponsor(s) and the administrative contact.
  2. Narrative – For each of the three following areas, please describe:
    1. The educational rationale and goals behind the proposal, the intended audience, and how it advances global solidarity through CRS as a part of the Catholic mission of the college.
    2. For Student Ambassadors grants: A project plan that demonstrates the capacity of sponsoring office and/or other existing structure to support the Student Ambassadors program.  Please describe how the campus will foster a community and establish a student organization of engaged students who will promote global solidarity events and sustain the organization from year to year, including recruitment of students, training, and projects or events to launch the group.  Additionally, please describe how CRS resources will be utilized in new projects or to enhance existing projects on campus.
    3. For Global Campus grants: A project plan that details how the proposal’s goals will be met, and identifies the specific resources needed to accomplish the plan and proposed activities. Outline how campus constituencies will collaborate to carry out the proposal and explain the potential for continuing activity.  Please include detailed information on how CRS resources will be used to enhance the project and how the project will move the campus toward becoming a CRS Global Campus.  For existing Global Campuses, please explain how the project strengthens the relationship with CRS and impact on campus.
    4. The qualifications of the sponsors to carry out the project, and qualifications of other persons (e.g., guest speakers) who may help with the project.

The narrative must be clear, complete, and free of jargon. Please limit the narrative to three to five double-spaced pages.

  1. Budget – Provide an itemized list of proposed expenditures (stipends, travel, reference and teaching materials, fees, etc.). Stipends may not exceed $125 per day for participants from the sponsor institution, and no one person may receive more than $500 total for work on the project. Appropriate honoraria for speakers may be proposed. Support from other sources should also be listed if a project’s total cost is expected to exceed $3,000. Charges for administrative overhead (to cover business or grant office expenses) may not exceed 10 percent of the project total. Funds will be released only when the project is completed.

Priority will be given in the application process to institutions that have not received global solidarity grants from CRS and ACCU in the past.

Grant applications are due on Friday, December 2, 2016, and should be submitted as a Word document or in PDF form to accu@accunet.org.  Proposals will be reviewed by a committee of three to five representatives from CRS and ACCU. Notifications to grant winners will be sent by January 2017. Final project reports should be submitted to ACCU no later than May 31, 2017. The final report must include a summary of the event or project, including evaluation by the grantee, and a description of plans to continue the work. Photos, videos, and any media coverage would also be welcomed with the final report.

Please address questions or comments to: Alexandra Bradley, Director of Membership and Member Services & Programs, Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities, One Dupont Circle NW, Suite 650, Washington, DC 20036. E-mail: abradley@accunet.org. Telephone: (202) 457-0650, ext. 224.