Rockhurst University Supports Child Mobility

Rockhurst University students have formed a chapter of GoBabyGo!, a non-profit focused on child mobility. Students transform motorized toy cars into mobility vehicles for children, tailoring to their individual needs whether from a visual impairment, cognitive disabilities, or a condition that limits a child’s mobility, like spina bifida.

Child mobility is linked with cognitive development. As children are able to move freely, they are more able to develop decision-making skills and experience new things.  These cars are significantly less expensive than many traditional mobility aides.

Rockhurst’s chapter of GoBabyGo! involves students who study physical therapy and engineering. In March 2015, they delivered their first vehicles to the Children Center for the Visually Impaired which was covered by local media, spurring more support for the project.

Cole Galloway, Ph.D., PT, founder of GoBabyGo, visited the Rockhurst chapter last fall, noting that the work is connected to the Jesuit values of social justice: “When you unpack this project, you see both sides–the science and the social justice. They go hand-in-hand. I think social justice is about listening to communities and getting behind them and fighting with them.”

To learn more about GoBabyGo! on Rockhurst’s campus, read the full article.

University of Scranton Hosts Event on Refugee Resettlement

In February, the University of Scranton hosted “The Future of Refugee Resettlement”, an event hosted by the University of Scranton’s In Solidarity with Syria committee. The event consisted in a discussion with William Canny, executive director of Migration and Refugee Services for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops and Maggie Walsh, Scranton High School English as a Second Language teacher, both graduates of the University of Scranton. Their discussion focused on both the international challenges of refugees and the local manifestation of these issues in the Scranton community. Canny addressed the vetting process in place in the United States for refugees and the moral imperative to care for refugees. Walsh spoke to her personal experience of teaching refugee children and their struggles.

The In Solidarity with Syria committee is a coordinated advocacy effort involving university administrators, faculty, staff, alumni, and students to aid those affected by the current immigration crisis through education and advocacy.

Read the full article on the University of Scranton event here.

Video Conference: Supporting Undocumented Students in a New Political Landscape

Join Ignatian Solidarity Network on Thursday, February 16 at 3 PM EST for an online conversation with Jesuit college and university faculty and administrators on how to support students who are undocumented. A new political landscape in the U.S. has brought with it unique realities for people in the without documentation, including students at Jesuit colleges and universities. How are faculty and administrators responding to the changing reality facing these students?

Panelists include:

Jennifer Ayala, Ph.D.
Director of The Center for Undocumented Students
Saint Peter’s University

Anna J. Brown
Chair, Department of Political Science
Saint Peter’s University

Kevin Mahaney
Associate Director of Student Financial Services
Georgetown University

Arelis Palacios
Undocumented Students Advisor, Division of Student Affairs
Georgetown University

Joe Saucedo
Director, Department of Student Diversity & Multicultural Affairs
Loyola University Chicago

To learn more or to register, visit the Ignatian Solidarity Network website.

Creighton University Collaborates with Local Organizations to Offer Hospitality to Refugees

As part of the Creighton Global Initiative (CGI), Creighton University has partnered with Lutheran Family Services to provide refugee families with aid in resettlement. Students spend their Friday afternoons shopping for necessities for a family migrating to the Omaha area. Setting up an apartment is the beginning of the resettlement process for refugees. This ministry encourages the students to remember the human face of the refugee crisis. One student, Sarah Huddleston, discovered that this service was different than others in the past because “It’s not just packing up my old clothes in a box and dropping them off and forgetting about it. It’s making a decision with the family in mind and trying to think about what you’d want if you were in a strange place, thousands of miles from your home.”

As René Padilla, executive director of global engagement, describes the program “Refugees are our neighbors…When we think of refugees we often hear the call to ‘welcome the stranger.’ And welcoming the stranger is a good first step. But in this increasingly interconnected world, these strangers are our neighbors and we need each other. Our hope is that this CGI project will help Creighton members to work with their refugee neighbors for justice.”

The Creighton Global Initiative is a program committed to expanding global learning by creating opportunities for heightened relationships, experiences and perspectives embracing Jesuit higher education’s centuries-long tradition for building global networks.  Read more on this partnership to assist refugee families here.

 

Saint Louis University and DePaul University Awarded National Honor for Diversity

Saint Louis University (SLU) and DePaul University are the proud recipients of INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine’s Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award. The award, given to colleges that promote diversity and inclusion on their campus, is the only national recognition of initiatives to create a diverse and inclusive campus.  Award recipients for 2016 include community colleges, public and private schools, baccalaureate-granting institutions, graduate schools, and one school system.

Congratulations to DePaul University, Saint Louis University, and the other winners!