Catholic Relief Services Releases Book on Migration

Catholic Relief Services (CRS) recently released a book on migration entitled Global Migration: What’s Happening, Why, and a Just Response, as a part of their newest Faculty Learning Commons academic modules on migration. The book, written by Elizabeth Collier from Dominican University and Charles Strain from DePaul University, unpacks the complex issues surrounding modern migration, including the reasons people might need or choose to leave their country of origin, and the laws, treaties, and resources that dictate the opportunities of migrants, refugees, asylum seekers and internally displaced people upon resettling.

Migration

This text offers personal narratives, principles for critical thinking drawn from Catholic social teaching, and opportunities for action from the individual to the international level.  Focused on the humanitarian work of CRS throughout the world, Global Migration inspires reflection, provokes discussion and empowers students to respond to today’s greatest humanitarian crisis.

This book is a part of the Faculty Learning Commons, online course materials for use in existing college and university classes to enrich the understanding of pressing issues in light of Catholic social teaching. The latest modules for Fall 2017-Spring 2018 are focused on migration.

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Video Conference: Supporting Undocumented Students in a New Political Landscape

Join Ignatian Solidarity Network on Thursday, February 16 at 3 PM EST for an online conversation with Jesuit college and university faculty and administrators on how to support students who are undocumented. A new political landscape in the U.S. has brought with it unique realities for people in the without documentation, including students at Jesuit colleges and universities. How are faculty and administrators responding to the changing reality facing these students?

Panelists include:

Jennifer Ayala, Ph.D.
Director of The Center for Undocumented Students
Saint Peter’s University

Anna J. Brown
Chair, Department of Political Science
Saint Peter’s University

Kevin Mahaney
Associate Director of Student Financial Services
Georgetown University

Arelis Palacios
Undocumented Students Advisor, Division of Student Affairs
Georgetown University

Joe Saucedo
Director, Department of Student Diversity & Multicultural Affairs
Loyola University Chicago

To learn more or to register, visit the Ignatian Solidarity Network website.

Catholic Colleges Host Events in Solidarity with Immigrants

Twelve Catholic colleges and universities hosted events in solidarity with immigrant brothers and sisters on January 19, as a part of the Ignatian Solidarity Network‘s call to prayer, Prayers of Light.

Saint Peter’s University hosted a prayer service featuring a student choir and students sharing their experience of being undocumented. The service ended with an opportunity to contact Congress on behalf of humane immigration policies.

Students at Loyola University Maryland held a walking candlelight vigil during the busy lunch hour at the campus student center.

Other colleges and universities that held events for the day of prayer include: Fairfield University, Xavier University, John Carroll University, Canisius College, Loyola University of Chicago, Marquette University, Saint Louis University, Gonzaga University, University of San Francisco, and Spring Hill College.

The purpose of the call to prayer was to illuminate, through solidarity and action, the dignity of our immigrant brothers and sisters, and the value of each person’s contribution to our country.  To see prayers and resources related to the event, visit the Ignatian Solidarity Network website.

How are you practicing solidarity on your campus? Share your story with us! Email Lexie Bradley.

University of Dayton Graduate Reflects on Study Abroad in Chile for National Migration Week

Sister of Charity of Cincinnati Tracy Kemme, an alumna of the University of Dayton, reflects on her experience in Chile while studying abroad as an undergraduate student for Global Sisters Report in honor of National Migration Week.

Thinking on her experience in Chile, she remembers “I got a taste of the beautiful diversity of the people of God. Our world is much bigger than I could have imagined growing up in the suburbs of Cincinnati, where most people looked, talked and thought like me. Over plates of arroz con pollo in sweltering little houses, the “poor” of Latin America catechized me. In building cross-cultural relationships, I’ve witnessed and felt the splendor of a mutual exchange of cultural goodness. My mind has been opened through honest conversations about the shadow side of cultures, including, and especially, my own. Perhaps most significantly, my experiences of being the “stranger” have made me a more compassionate “welcomer.”

Kemme encourages all readers to have experiences where they become a “stranger” by traveling to new places or neighborhoods to live the theme of this year’s National Migration Week, Creating a Culture of Encounter.

Read the full article here.

Prayers of Light: A Call to Prayer for Immigrants

The Ignatian Solidarity Network (ISN) is organizing a day of prayer on January 19, 2017 as a way “to illuminate the dignity of our immigrant brothers and sisters, and the value of each individual’s contribution to the country.” They offer resources and ideas for organizing prayer on that day on their website.

ISN offers ideas of how to become involved:

  • Host a prayer service or intention a Mass at your campus, parish, or organization for immigrants
  • Use symbols of light such as vigil candles as a part of your prayer experience
  • Lift up the stories of immigrant members of your community
  • Invite the local community to join you in prayer
  • Pray for our new governmental leaders to enact policies that illuminate the dignity of immigrant brothers and sisters
  • Create environments of prayer that focus on illuminating the social teachings of our Catholic faith and other faith traditions

More resources and prayers are available on their website.