University of San Diego Hosts 10th Annual Relay for Life

University of San Diego recently fought back against cancer by hosting their 10th Annual Relay for Life. The event ran from 3 pm until midnight and attracted hundreds of students, faculty, and staff that formed a variety of teams. Considering this is the 10th anniversary of the relay, USD took a look back at how the relay began on campus. 10 years ago a USD graduate student participated in a relay in Hawaii and wanted to bring it to the campus. Since 2008, thousands of people have participated in the relay and raised thousands of dollars for the American Cancer Society.

According to the American Cancer sSociety, “one out of every 100 Americans participates in a Relay of Life event and there are events in more than 600 communities that span 19 countries outside the United States.” University of San Diego is honored and happy to be one community that participates in the work for the greater good of supporting those struggling with cancer.

To read more about this event, visit University of San Diego news.

Loyola Marymount Professor Uses Graphic Design to Promote Social Justice

A professor at Loyola Marymount University is using art to promote social justice throughout her classes. Saeri Cho Dobson, associate professor of graphic design, teaches her students that graphic design is a medium that has the opportunity to persuade its viewers. When Cho came to LMU she was inspired by their Jesuit mission of promoting social justice so she began to partner with the Center for Service and Action which connected her with nonprofits in Los Angeles.

Cho centered her design entrepreneurship class on a final student project that incorporated social justice work. She explained how a group of her students “worked with the Lamp Community in downtown Los Angeles, which has art and music programs for homeless people. The students developed a project to design a portable, solar-paneled cell-phone charger for homeless people, who aren’t always welcome in cafes or restaurants as a place to charge their phone.” Cho hopes that her students learn they can foster community and a commitment to social justice through their designs.

To read more about Cho’s class, visit LMU news.

Marian University Volunteer with Saints in the Streets

Students and staff from Marian University recently showed their dedication and support for their local community. Marian University volunteered for Saints in the Streets neighborhood clean-up sponsored by St. Anthony and St. Barnabas churches. The service work they did including pulling weeds, picking up trash, and raking leaves; tasks that may at times feel mundane but are very necessary. Saints in the Street attracts a large following of people that want to create a more pleasant community, including Indianapolis mayor Joe Hogsett.

Students noted that it “was awesome to see the community, including Mayor Joe Hogsett, come together to make our city a better place. Our goal was to clean the streets and make them look beautiful.” Local residents of the neighborhood also helped and showed their appreciation to volunteers.

To read more about Saints in the Streets, visit Marian news.

Merrimack College Helps Pack 15K Lunches for Local Food Bank

Merrimack College recently partnered with the Center for the Study of Jewish-Christian-Muslim Relations and Outreach Inc. to pack 15,000 meals for the Merrimack Valley Food Bank. This is the fourth year that volunteers gathered together to pack meals in assembly lines which gave them the opportunity to “meet people of other faith traditions while engaging in dialogue and reflection-making the day even more meaningful.”

Fr. Raymond Dlugos, vice president for missions and ministry at the university, noted that the event “allows the wider community to appreciate the culture of care, concern, and respect for the dignity of others that is a hallmark of our campus. And it demonstrates that this culture not only exists in a few individuals who go out and serve, but it is actually a part of the air we breathe here on this campus.”

To read more about this food drive, visit Merrimack news.

Iona College’s Partnership shows they are still #StrongerThantheStorm

Students from Iona College in New Rochelle, New York participated in the St. Bernard Project “Friends of Rockaway.” Friends of Rockaway seeks to aid victims whose lives were shattered from Hurricane Sandy, which occured nearly five years ago. The St. Bernard Project also helps “recovery of several disaster-impacted communities in the area. Its main roles are home repair and clean up, both of which Iona College students got to take part in.”

Although the Hurricane Sandy happened five years ago, there are still significantly numbers of families that are struggling to get back on their feet and return to where they were financially prior to the storm. Iona College has participated with the St. Bernard Project for a number of years now, with students noting that “the kind-hearted staff of St. Bernard’s was a great community to work with.” Most recently students helped rebuild a family’s home from the ground up. Students also said that the “on-going need for continued assistance in picking up the pieces for those lives have been affected by Hurricane Sandy” needs to be reiterated because there is still so much to be done.

To read more about Iona’s partnership with the St. Bernard Project, visit Iona news.

Saint Anselm Nursing Students Take their Services and Learning Worldwide

Saint Anselm College nursing students recently further developed their skills while completing clinical work in Cost Rica through the course, Community and Public Health Nursing. Through this immersion experience, students have the opportunity to “assess families in the community to provide health education, and then refer sick patients to receive health care in the clinic that the group sets up and works at.” This winter trip is a core component of the course which aims to discuss the role and impact of nurses in health promotion and disease prevention on a worldwide scale. The goal is for students to discuss what they learned in Cost Rica in a classroom context to further understand the concepts of communicable disease, environmental health, and disaster relief.

Students note that the course takes on a holistic approach, by stating “it has a focus on not just assessment but on the resources available to vulnerable populations, and learning how to treat the whole person.” This fits perfectly in line with the Saint Ambrose’s mission of fostering a “lifelong pursuit of truth and fostering intellectual, moral and spiritual growth to sustain and enrich its graduates’ personal lives, work, and engagement within local, national, and global communities.”

To read more about Saint Anselm nursing student’s experience, visit Saint Anselm news.