Georgetown University Hosts Liturgy of Penance for Sale of Enslaved People

ICYMI: Earlier this year, Georgetown University hosted a Liturgy of Remembrance, Contrition and Hope as a moment to express contrition for the institutional sin of selling 272 enslaved people to raise money for preserve the university in 1838.

“Now, nearly 200 years later, we cannot heal from this tragic history alone. Many have confessed and labored to atone for this sin, but mostly within the confines of our own religious houses and apostolic works. Because we are profoundly sorry, we stand before God—and before you, the descendants of those whom we enslaved—and we apologize for what we have done and what we have failed to do,” Father Timothy Kesicki, S.J., president, of the Jesuit Conference of Canada and the United States said.

Learn more about the event by reading the full article on the America website.

 

Get Ready for World Refugee Day!

Now available – resources on the global refugee crisis in anticipation of World Refugee Day on June 20.

to go forth

Todd Scribner, Education Outreach Coordinator, Migration & Refugee Services/USCCB

Every year on June 20, the international community acknowledges World Refugee Day. World Refugee Day provides an opportunity to reflect on the conditions confronting the millions of people who have been forced from their homes and countries under threat of persecution and possible death and to acknowledge their humanity.

The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees estimates the number of forcibly displaced people globally to be at about 65.3 million, including 21.3 refugees. We are today experiencing the largest refugee crisis since the end of World War II. This is a troubling fact that deserves careful attention and global collaboration.

World Refugee Day provides us all an opportunity to better understand the international circumstances that give rise to displacement, the various solutions that are in place to respond to the problem, and the important role of the U.S. resettlement system in…

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Inclusion on Campus: Reach Out to National Organizations to Learn More

Many organizations and federal agencies offer support to students from underrepresented backgrounds, their families, and institutions that want to serve them. The U.S. Department of Education lists such offices here.

Organizations like the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities offer useful programming and research for campuses, as does Excelencia in Education. Excelencia in Education is an organization dedicated to Latino student success in higher education by providing data-driven analysis of the educational status of Latinos. Excelencia in Education is a resource for influencing policy at the institutional, state, and national level and a network of educators and policymakers.

ACCU member Mexican American Catholic College also offers programming for other Catholic colleges that want to better serve the Hispanic population.

This post concludes our “Inclusion on Campus” series, short stories about how Catholic institutions are promoting diversity as an expression of God’s grandeur. To learn more, read the first blog post in the Inclusion on Campus series, or see the full list of tips on the ACCU website.  Want to share a promising practice from your campus?  We welcome you to leave a comment or email Lexie Bradley (abradley@accunet.org) to share your success story.

President of Trinity Washington University Honored with Faith Doing Justice Award

The Ignatian Solidarity Network honored Patricia McGuire, president of Trinity Washington University, with the Robert M. Holstein Faith Doing Justice Award.  The Holstein Award honors one individual each year “who has demonstrated a significant commitment to leadership for social justice grounded in the spirituality of St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Society of Jesus (Jesuits).”

Patricia McGuire was named the president of Trinity Washington University (then Trinity College) in 1989. She helped to rebuild the college by reaching out to black and Hispanic women of Washington, transforming the college into a multifaceted university. Today, Trinity serves as an example of how to widen collegiate access and welcome students who have lived on the margins. Over 2,000 students are enrolled in degree programs and 3,000 are in Trinity’s continuing education programs. School enrollment is 67 percent African American, 21 percent Hispanic, 6 percent white and 6 percent international.

McGuire is an advocate for women and social justice, committed to the transformative power of education. To learn more about McGuire and the award, read the full article from the Ignatian Solidarity Network.

Inclusion on Campus: Connect with Efforts Addressing Diversity Beyond Campus

St. Thomas University (FL) partners with MCCJ, formerly the Miami Coalition for Christians and Jews, for the annual MetroTown diversity leadership camp on the university’s campus. The six-day camp brings together high school students from across the region to learn cross-cultural teamwork and conflict resolution by exploring race, ethnicity, religion, gender, and socio-economic issues. Thomas University’s Center for Community Engagement (CCE) staff served alongside MCCJ staff as hosts and counselors of the camp, while introducing the students to the opportunities for community-engaged learning at the university.

Students from the University of St. Francis (IL) serve as fellows for the Multi-Cultural Education Recruitment in Teaching program, which seeks to increase diversity among PK-12 teachers. Participants explore issues related to the demographics of the teacher and student pipelines, as well as national efforts to diversify the teaching profession.

Over the next few weeks, we will release short examples of diversity at Catholic institutions of higher education as part of a series called “Inclusion on Campus”.  Stay tuned to hear how Catholic institutions are promoting diversity as an expression of God’s grandeur!