Get Ready for World Refugee Day!

Now available – resources on the global refugee crisis in anticipation of World Refugee Day on June 20.

to go forth

Todd Scribner, Education Outreach Coordinator, Migration & Refugee Services/USCCB

Every year on June 20, the international community acknowledges World Refugee Day. World Refugee Day provides an opportunity to reflect on the conditions confronting the millions of people who have been forced from their homes and countries under threat of persecution and possible death and to acknowledge their humanity.

The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees estimates the number of forcibly displaced people globally to be at about 65.3 million, including 21.3 refugees. We are today experiencing the largest refugee crisis since the end of World War II. This is a troubling fact that deserves careful attention and global collaboration.

World Refugee Day provides us all an opportunity to better understand the international circumstances that give rise to displacement, the various solutions that are in place to respond to the problem, and the important role of the U.S. resettlement system in…

View original post 496 more words

Inclusion on Campus: Reach Out to National Organizations to Learn More

Many organizations and federal agencies offer support to students from underrepresented backgrounds, their families, and institutions that want to serve them. The U.S. Department of Education lists such offices here.

Organizations like the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities offer useful programming and research for campuses, as does Excelencia in Education. Excelencia in Education is an organization dedicated to Latino student success in higher education by providing data-driven analysis of the educational status of Latinos. Excelencia in Education is a resource for influencing policy at the institutional, state, and national level and a network of educators and policymakers.

ACCU member Mexican American Catholic College also offers programming for other Catholic colleges that want to better serve the Hispanic population.

This post concludes our “Inclusion on Campus” series, short stories about how Catholic institutions are promoting diversity as an expression of God’s grandeur. To learn more, read the first blog post in the Inclusion on Campus series, or see the full list of tips on the ACCU website.  Want to share a promising practice from your campus?  We welcome you to leave a comment or email Lexie Bradley (abradley@accunet.org) to share your success story.

President of Trinity Washington University Honored with Faith Doing Justice Award

The Ignatian Solidarity Network honored Patricia McGuire, president of Trinity Washington University, with the Robert M. Holstein Faith Doing Justice Award.  The Holstein Award honors one individual each year “who has demonstrated a significant commitment to leadership for social justice grounded in the spirituality of St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Society of Jesus (Jesuits).”

Patricia McGuire was named the president of Trinity Washington University (then Trinity College) in 1989. She helped to rebuild the college by reaching out to black and Hispanic women of Washington, transforming the college into a multifaceted university. Today, Trinity serves as an example of how to widen collegiate access and welcome students who have lived on the margins. Over 2,000 students are enrolled in degree programs and 3,000 are in Trinity’s continuing education programs. School enrollment is 67 percent African American, 21 percent Hispanic, 6 percent white and 6 percent international.

McGuire is an advocate for women and social justice, committed to the transformative power of education. To learn more about McGuire and the award, read the full article from the Ignatian Solidarity Network.

Inclusion on Campus: Connect with Efforts Addressing Diversity Beyond Campus

St. Thomas University (FL) partners with MCCJ, formerly the Miami Coalition for Christians and Jews, for the annual MetroTown diversity leadership camp on the university’s campus. The six-day camp brings together high school students from across the region to learn cross-cultural teamwork and conflict resolution by exploring race, ethnicity, religion, gender, and socio-economic issues. Thomas University’s Center for Community Engagement (CCE) staff served alongside MCCJ staff as hosts and counselors of the camp, while introducing the students to the opportunities for community-engaged learning at the university.

Students from the University of St. Francis (IL) serve as fellows for the Multi-Cultural Education Recruitment in Teaching program, which seeks to increase diversity among PK-12 teachers. Participants explore issues related to the demographics of the teacher and student pipelines, as well as national efforts to diversify the teaching profession.

Over the next few weeks, we will release short examples of diversity at Catholic institutions of higher education as part of a series called “Inclusion on Campus”.  Stay tuned to hear how Catholic institutions are promoting diversity as an expression of God’s grandeur!

Inclusion on Campus: Involve Alumni to Support Diversity Initiatives

Many graduates who have achieved success are looking to give back. The University of Dayton’s Office of Multicultural Affairs (OMA) offers an Alumni Engagement Program that connects alumni with current students who are of diverse backgrounds, helping boost student retention and persistence. The program cultivates opportunities for graduates to provide mentorship and other forms of support, while identifying students who would benefit from alumni guidance. Alumni provide support for current undergraduate students in a variety of ways such as as a resource to empower students in their major or field of interest, participating in ongoing programming through OMA, writing a letter of encouragement, or sponsoring a student’s textbooks through the Diverse Students Population fund.

Over the next few weeks, we will release short examples of diversity at Catholic institutions of higher education as part of a series called “Inclusion on Campus”.  Stay tuned to hear how Catholic institutions are promoting diversity as an expression of God’s grandeur!

Catholic Relief Services Releases Book on Migration

Catholic Relief Services (CRS) recently released a book on migration entitled Global Migration: What’s Happening, Why, and a Just Response, as a part of their newest Faculty Learning Commons academic modules on migration. The book, written by Elizabeth Collier from Dominican University and Charles Strain from DePaul University, unpacks the complex issues surrounding modern migration, including the reasons people might need or choose to leave their country of origin, and the laws, treaties, and resources that dictate the opportunities of migrants, refugees, asylum seekers and internally displaced people upon resettling.

Migration

This text offers personal narratives, principles for critical thinking drawn from Catholic social teaching, and opportunities for action from the individual to the international level.  Focused on the humanitarian work of CRS throughout the world, Global Migration inspires reflection, provokes discussion and empowers students to respond to today’s greatest humanitarian crisis.

This book is a part of the Faculty Learning Commons, online course materials for use in existing college and university classes to enrich the understanding of pressing issues in light of Catholic social teaching. The latest modules for Fall 2017-Spring 2018 are focused on migration.